Toddler play: why it’s important for talking development

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Toddler play: why it’s important for talking development
Young children grow, learn, and explore the world primarily through play. 

Playing with your child provides many opportunities to converse. The more you play and speak with your kid, the more words he or she can hear. This also provides an opportunity for your child to learn about how sounds, sentences, and conversations work. This helps your child's brain grow while also improving their speaking skills.

What to expect: a talking toddler 

While your child has been learning about words, sounds, and back-and-forth interactions since birth, your child's language begins to 'explode' in the toddler years. 

Your toddler would most likely do the following between the ages of 12 and 18 months: 

1. Say their first words, but keep in mind that you and other immediate family members might be the only ones who understand what they mean. 
2. Have fun babbling while you're talking. 
3. When naming common things, point them out.

By the age of two, your toddler would most likely: 

1. Have fun calling things like "doggie" and "drink." 
2. Recognize and comply with a simple order, such as "Bring me your book" or "Wave bye-bye." 
3. Have difficulty with certain sounds; for example, they can say "wed" when they mean "red." 

By the age of three, your child would most likely: 

1. Start with easy sentences like, "Where has the doggie gone?" 
2. Use terms and phrases that most strangers will understand. 
3. Recognize the majority of what adults say .
4. Begin to use pronouns (I, you, me, we, they) and plurals (I, you, me, we, they).
To get your toddler talking, try these gameplay: 

The more words you introduce to your kid, the more words he or she will pick up. Here are some fun ways to get your toddler to talk: 

1. Purchase books. Share a book with your child. 
2. Talk about the mundane tasks you do on a daily basis, such as "I'm hanging these clothes to dry outside because it's a pleasant day." 
3. Pay attention to and discuss your child's desires. Tell your child where they're going if they're pretending to drive a car, for example. 
4. Sing songs and recite nursery rhymes. In the car, play rhymes, stories, and songs. 
5. Promote two-way dialogue by copying your child's attempts at vocabulary. 
6. Leave time after you talk to give your child a chance to reply. Your child might not always have the right words, but they’ll still try to respond. This helps children learn about conversation.

EXPLORE THESE: 
  • Toy phone
  • Play books.
  • RHYME PLAYING WALKERS
Children's Territory has toys that are not only fun but also educational and innovative for your toddler's growth and can help you to get them talking.  Buy yours online.

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  • Rockims Team