Tips for Choosing Learning Toys for Toddlers

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Tips for Choosing Learning Toys for Toddlers
Toddlers are curious little people who learn by doing. Playing allows your child to learn and practise new skills at her own pace while pursuing their individual interests. The toys and playthings that your child has access to can have a significant impact on their growth.

Toys for toddlers come in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and materials. How do you know which ones are appropriate for your child? How do you know which ones are of good quality and will last? Which of the above would hold your child's attention for more than a few days or weeks? Here are some suggestions for toys that will grow with your child, challenge them, and help them develop in all areas (Their thinking, physical, language and social-emotional skills).

1. Choose toys that can be used in a variety of ways.

Toddlers enjoy taking things apart, putting them back together, pulling things out, putting things back in, adding on, and building things up. Choose toys that are "open-ended," meaning that your child will use them to play a number of games. A road, a zoo, a bridge, or a spaceship, for example, can be constructed using wooden or chunky plastic interlocking blocks. Children's territory offers the reliant wood blocking games , feel free to check out by the end of this blog.

2. Look for toys that will grow with your child.

We've all had the experience of purchasing a toy that our child plays with for two days and then abandons. You can avoid this by searching for toys that are enjoyable at various stages of growth.

3. Select toys that encourage exploration and problem-solving.

Play gives children the chance to practice new skills over and over again. Toys that give kids a chance to figure something out on their own—or with a little coaching—build their logical thinking skills and help them become persistent problem-solvers.

Examples: Puzzles, shape-sorters, blocks, nesting blocks or cups, art materials like clay, paint, crayons or play-dough

4. Look for toys that spark your child’s imagination.

Your child's imagination blossoms during his third year, when they learn to play the part of someone else (such as a king) and pretend that something (such as a block) is really something else (like a piece of cake). Look for toys that your child can use to act out stories as they grows up. Pretend play improves language and reading skills, as well as problem-solving and sequencing abilities (put events in a logical order).

5. Toss in some “getting ready to read” toys.

Books, magnetic alphabet letters, and art supplies like markers, crayons, and fingerpaints help your child develop early writing and reading skills. “Real-life” props like take-out menus, catalogs, or magazines are fun for your child to look at and play with and also build familiarity with letters, text, and print.
Remember, the more your child has to use their mind and body to problem solve and develop their own ideas, the more they learn.

Visit Children's Territory for toys that are not just fun but educational and progressive for your toddler's development. 

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  • Rockims Team